M.F.A PROGRAM curriculum

The M.F.A. in Creative Writing at Southern is a 48-credit, terminal degree that can be completed in two years of full-time study, or several years of part-time study. The M.F.A. culminates in the completion of the thesis, a book-length manuscript of either fiction or poetry. The M.F.A. degree at Southern requires: 

Total classes: 14 and thesis  (Total: 48 credits)

COURSE NUMBER SEQUENCE FOR WORKSHOPS

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR THE MAJOR AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION

The craft and art of creating plot, character, scene, conflict, and style.  Scheduled fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite: ENG 406 or departmental permission.  Always scheduled.  3 credits.

Further practice in the craft and art of creating plot, character, scene, conflict, and style.  Scheduled fall and spring semesters.  Prerequisite: ENG 502 or departmental permission.  This course may be repeated for credit.  Always scheduled.  3 credits.

The craft and art of writing poetry.  Scheduled fall and spring semesters. Prerequisite: ENG 402 or departmental permission.  Always scheduled. 3 credits.

Further practice in the craft and art of writing poetry.  Scheduled fall and spring semesters.  Prerequisite: ENG 506 or departmental permission.  This course may be repeated for credit. Always scheduled. 3 credits.

Research and writing of the thesis in the area of concentration, under the direction of an English department faculty member.  For specific details, consult the chairperson or graduate coordinator of the department.  Prerequisite: department permission.  3 or 6 credits.

A SAMPLE OF COURSES TO FULFILL REQUIREMENTS IN LITERATURE, LITERARY THEORY, & ELECTIVES WITHIN THE ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

ENG 504     The Teaching of Writing
ENG 505     Applied English Linguistics
ENG 508     Contemporary Critical Theory
ENG 509     Contemporary Poetic Theory
ENG 510     History of the English Language
ENG 511     Love and the Body in Medieval Consciousness
ENG 514     English Medieval Literature
ENG 517     Research Methods and Critical Theory
ENG 518     Philosophy of Composition
ENG 519     Teaching College Writing
ENG 521     Feminist Theory and Literary Criticism 
ENG 522     Wright, Ellison, and Baldwin
ENG 523     Contemporary African-American Literature
ENG 524     The Harlem Renaissance
ENG 525     17th Century Poetry
ENG 529     African American Rhetorical Theory
ENG 531     Feminist Rhetorical Theory
ENG 536     Early Victorians: 1837-1870
ENG 537     Later Victorians: 1870-1914
ENG 538     Victorian Novel
ENG 542     Shakespeare
ENG 548     Modern and Contemporary Drama
ENG 552     English Renaissance
ENG 555     The 18th Century: Age of Satire
ENG 557     Romantic Period
ENG 559     20th Century English Literature
ENG 560     20th Century American Drama
ENG 562     The American Novel Before 1850
ENG 564     Poe, Hawthorne, and Melville
ENG 565     Emerson, Thoreau, and Whitman
ENG 566     20th Century American Poets
ENG 567     Mark Twain, Howells, and James
ENG 568     American Novel: 1900-1945
ENG 569     American Novel Since 1945
ENG 580     Chaucer
ENG 581     Medieval Women and Literature
ENG 583     Arthurian Legend
ENG 584     Milton
ENG 585     Seminar on Special Topics in Composition/Rhetoric
ENG 586     Seminar in American Literature
ENG 587     Seminar in British Literature
ENG 588     Seminar in Comparative Literature

THESIS

For completion of the M.F.A. degree, each student will produce a creative thesis, a book-length manuscript of original, imaginative work under the advisement of a member of the creative-writing faculty and the consultation of a second reader. This manuscript may consist of a novel, a novel excerpt, a memoir, a collection of stories or poems, or a combination of the above as agreed upon by the advisor and the second reader. The thesis process culminates with a thesis defense, a rigorous questioning and investigation of the student's thesis by the advisor and second reader. The production of the creative thesis typically takes at least a year and consists of multiple drafts and revisions based on meetings with the advisor and second reader, but may take longer if necessary to attain the quality of work required by the faculty readers.

Detailed thesis guidelines that apply to theses for all graduate programs in the English Department can be found by clicking here.