Multimedia Resources

About 1619 and the 400th

National Media

 

  • The 1619 Project is a major initiative from The New York Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. It aims to reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding, and placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of the story we tell ourselves about who we are.
    "Nikole Hannah-Jones, a Times staff writer who conceived the idea for the newspaper's 'The 1619 Project.' Screenshot from video. United States, 2019.""
    Nikole Hannah-Jones, a Times staff writer who conceived the idea for the newspaper's "The 1619 Project."
  • Through its 1619 Project, The New York Times acknowledged the 400th anniversary of the first enslaved Africans brought to America.  On Aug 13, 2019, The Times featured a live-stream video of performance art, poetry, and discussion on the genesis of the project (see the video here and below), it follows with a series of powerful and insightful essays on the impact of slavery in shaping every aspect of American life to the present.
  • The PBS NewsHour aired a report on August 18, 2019, discussing The New York Times Magazine's launch of The 1619 Project to reframe America’s history through the lens of slavery.
     
  • WNET/Thirteen, a New York-based PBS affiliate, produced a website --Slavery and the Making of America -- with a timeline of events marking the history of slavery in America.
     
  • The Pulitzer Center, the education partner for The 1619 Project, inaugurated by the special issue of The New York Times Magazine, has produced a website with curricular resources, including a reading guide for the issue, activities to engage students, and more.
    Students at Washington Global Public Charter School practice journalism skills in a Pulitzer Center workshop. Image by Eslah Attar. United States, 2017.
    Students at Washington Global Public Charter School practice journalism skills in a Pulitzer Center workshop.
  • At the Congressional Black Caucus Annual Legislative Conference, held in Washington, D.C., in September 2019, the conference theme -- “400 Years: Our Legacy, Our Possibilities” -- suffused the public policy forums, panel discussions and conversations in the convention hallways and corners as registrants, lawmakers, thought leaders and millennials delved into a range of issues and concerns.

Connecticut Media

  • Journalism Professor Frank Harris III has created a website to commemorate the first Africans and their descendants in America. Harris writes on the site:  “When it occurred to me several years ago that 2019 would mark the 400th anniversary of the first enslaved Africans brought to America, I began asking Americans how America should observe the 400th, if indeed it should be observed, invariably, every person I spoke with was unaware of the 400th until I informed them, and when I did, they were awestruck. My mission became to utilize my role as a journalism professor, news columnist, filmmaker and public speaker to get the word out about the 400th, to encourage activities to observe it. In the process of doing so, I learned much more about slavery that makes this site relevant beyond 2019."
     
  • As part of his 400th project, Harris produced a short film, "They Came Across the Water: Precious Black Cargo," to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the first enslaved Africans and their descendants in America.
     
  • Harris published a column, "In remembrance of slavery," in the Hartford Courant on October 17, 2019, in anticipation of the week-long series of 1619 commemorative events taking place on Southern's campus.
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