undergraduate Majors (B.A. or B.S.)

The major in a foreign language develops mastery of a language (French, German, Italian, or Spanish) and expertise in its associated cultures. The primary aim of the beginning courses is to develop communicative competence in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes, while the advanced courses reinforce these while facilitating more in-depth exploration of culture, primarily through literature. The program qualifies graduates for teaching at the secondary school level and satisfies the requirements for graduate school study.

The program consists of 30 credits. Students who enter the university with advanced standing or proficiency in a foreign language may fulfill the requirements of the major by taking courses in a second language, as approved by the department.

Foreign language majors in B.A. degree programs must complete the language requirement by taking a level IV (or higher level) course in a second language or by taking 33 credits in their major language. For course descriptions, see the course catalog.

Foreign language majors in B.S. degree programs must complete the language requirement by taking a level II (or higher level) course in a second language or by taking 33 credits in their major language. For course descriptions, see the course catalog.

Students planning to major in a foreign language select courses, with the consent of their adviser, carefully observing sequential relationships. Students seeking foreign language teaching certification must take a series of education and foreign language education courses. See the FLT Certification section for more information.

Study abroad is strongly recommended, primarily through the International Programs Office. The department sponsors summer program in Spain and study in Austria.

Foreign language majors are required to take a 3-credit world literature course. They may take one LIT 300- or 400- level course focusing on works by authors of French, German, Italian, Spanish, or other literary traditions or related topics, such as literary theory, the relationship of literature and the arts, or comparative approaches. For course descriptions, see the course catalog.