Graduate Courses

graduate courses in women's studies



WMS 500 — Feminist Theories & Practices
This cross-cultural, interdisciplinary course explores contemporary feminist theories and practices, examining the intersections of various feminism including liberal, radical, marxist-socialist, postmodern, and multicultural positions. The course also integrates the concept of feminist practice through the study of such topics as feminist art, community activism, and ecofeminism. Scheduled every fall semester. 

WMS 504  Gender and the Law
An analysis of the American legal system as it has affected women from the 18th century to the present. Course content is applicable for any student with an interest in the law. Topics include constitutional protections for equality, Title VII (including sexual harassment and sex discrimination), reproductive rights, domestic violence, and Title IX (educational and sports equity). Dual-listed with SOC 504.

WMS 510  Research Methods in Women's Studies
Interdisciplinary approach to a broad range of feminist research methodologies essential for planning and conducting research in the field of women's studies; will include written and oral presentation of student research project. Scheduled every spring semester.

WMS 515  Sociology of Gender
Theory and data on the social construction of gender. Advanced exploration of identity formation, social change and persistence, interactive patterns and inequalities. Impact of gender on the individual and society. Scheduled alternative fall semesters. Dual listed with SOC 515.

WMS 520   History of Feminist Thought
A survey of women's intellectual history from ancient cultures to the contemporary period using primary sources, including ancient and classical texts, and focusing on the works of leading European and American feminist thinkers. The course will also cover the formation of women's communities and the corresponding evolution of the feminist movement. Scheduled every fall semester.

WMS 521  Feminist Theory and Literary Criticism
Inquiry into the fundamental problems of feminist thought and the interrelationship of feminist theory, critical theory, and literary criticism. Dual listed with ENG 521.

WMS 523  Anthropological Perspectives of Gender
An examination of the concepts of gender developed in the major subfields of anthropology with an emphasis on the cross-cultural comparison. Dual listed with ANT 523.

WMS 525  Feminist Pedagogy
Examines feminist pedagogical theory and theories of teaching women's studies courses in order to prepare students to conceptualize, develop, and teach women's studies courses in other disciplines with a women's studies emphasis at the secondary and/or post-secondary level. Scheduled spring of odd years.

WMS 529  Race, Class and Gender
This course explores the intersection of race, class, and gender in social relations. Uses a wide variety of theoretical perspectives to investigate the ways that race, class, and gender are intersected and the impact this interrelationship has on the experiences and opportunities of individuals and their social location. Dual listed with ANT 529 and SOC 529.

WMS 530  Global Women's Issues
Interdisciplinary study of issues affecting women in cross-cultural perspectives, such as international feminism, reproductive rights, health, global economy, women in leadership. Scheduled every spring semester.

WMS 531  Feminist Rhetorical Theory
An inquiry into feminist rhetoric within its different historical, social, economic, political, and material contexts and its impact on social change. Same as ENG 531.

WMS 535  Colonial and Victorian Women in the U.S.
Survey of reading about when from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century on the following topics: family, work, immigration, urbanization, industrialization, race, class, ethnicity, and cultural and political status. Dual listed with HIS 535.

WMS 536  Progressive and Modern Women in the U.S.
Survey of readings and research from the late nineteenth century to the present on the following topics: family, work, immigration, urbanization, altruism, professionalism, race, class, ethnicity, and cultural and political status. Dual listed with HIS 536.

WMS 549  The Impact of Women in Theatre
A course which illuminates the contributions of women to the development of theatre particularly in the areas of playwriting, theatrical theory, criticism and directing. Dual listed with THR 549.

WMS 554  Violence in the Family; Intervention Strategies
Themes of violence in the family; socio-political theories of violence; diverse interventions; violence and oppression; implications for social work, law, and medical professions. Dual listed with SOC 554.

WMS 555  Sexual Minorities: A Social Work Response
The problems associated with America's homophobic attitudes toward sexual minorities such as gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered individuals and the impact of such attitudes on relationships in both professional and non-professional settings will be explored. Dual listed with SOC 555.

WMS 560  Seminar in the Psychology of Women
Psychological research about women is examined in light of its contributions to psychology as a science, including its social and political implications. The course also explores health, diagnosis, and therapy for women. Dual listed with PSY 560.

WMS 573  Women, Art, and Education
A seminar and cooperative learning course which addresses issues of sexism, racism, cultural bias, elitism, historical and contemporary perspectives of women's contributions to the arts as artists, educators, philosophers, historians, patrons, and collectors. Dual listed with ART 573.

WMS 581  Medieval Women and Literature
Consideration of texts composed by and/or for women and images of women in such texts. Typical figures include Marie de France, Heloise, Dame Julian, Margery Kempe, and Christine de Pizan. Dual listed with ENG 581.

WMS 590  Thesis Seminar I
First of two courses fulfilling one of the exit requirement options. Development of a thesis proposal under the dual supervision of the instructor and the thesis adviser in the context of peer evaluation. Classes will meet at two-week intervals during the semester. Restricted to matriculated Women's Studies master's degree candidates with 15 credits of course work including WMS 500 and WMS 510. Scheduled every fall semester.

WMS 591  Thesis Seminar II
Second of two courses fulfilling one of the exit requirement options. Development of the thesis under the dual supervision of the instructor and the thesis adviser in the context of peer evaluation. Classes will meet at two-week intervals during the semester. Restricted to matriculated Women's Studies master's degree candidate with 18 credits of course work including WMS 590. Scheduled every spring semester.

WMS 592  Special Project Seminar I
First of two courses fulfilling one of the exit requirement options. Development of a special project proposal relevant to the student's own academic specialization and interests under the dual supervision of the instructor and the special project adviser in the context of peer evaluation. Classes will meet at two-week intervals during the semester. Restricted to matriculated Women's Studies master's degree candidates who have completed 15 credits of course work including WMS 500 and WMS 510. Scheduled every fall semester.

WMS 593  Special Project Seminar II
Second of two courses fulfilling one of the exit requirement options. Development of a special project proposal relevant to the student's own academic specialization and interests under the dual supervision of the instructor and the special project adviser in the context of peer evaluation. Classes will meet at two-week intervals during the semester. Restricted to matriculated Women's Studies master's degree candidates who have completed 18 credits of course work including WMS 592. Scheduled every spring semester.

WMS 599  Topics in Women's Studies
Various topics in women's studies are explored from multidisciplinary perspectives. Topics offered in recent years include Ecofeminism; Gender, Race, Class in Children's Literature; Self-Representations of Immigrant Women; Take Back the Kitchen; and so forth. (See more listings below).

WMS 600  Independent Study and Research
Provides students with an opportunity for supervised independent research under the direction of a faculty member. Permission of the coordinators required.

WMS 601  Field Experience I
A required course for all Women's Studies students (students may substitute an internship through a cooperating host department for the field experience). Field experience options are: administrative field experience in the Women's Studies Program; administrative field experience in the Women's Center; academic field experience in a Women' Studies classroom; research-based field experience under the supervision of a Women' Studies faculty member. A field experience requires a commitment of 150 hours (10 hours per week) per semester. Prerequisite: matriculated Women's Studies degree candidates who have completed 9 credits of graduate Women's Studies coursework and coordinators' permission.

WMS 602  Field Experience II
An elective course for all Women's Studies students (students may substitute an internship through a cooperating host department for field experience). Students select among the following options: administrative field experience in the Women's Studies Program; administrative field experience in the Women's Center; academic field experience in a Women's Studies classroom; research-based field experience under the supervision of a Women's Studies faculty member. A field experience requires a commitment of 150 hours (10 hours per week) per semester. Prerequisite: matriculated Women's Studies degree candidates who have completed 9 credits of graduate Women's Studies coursework and coordinators' permission.

In addition to the regularly offered Women's Studies courses, a range of special topics courses are offered. Some courses offered in the past have included: Evolution of Black Feminist Though; Gender, Race, Class in Young Adult Literature; Feminist Utopias; Psychoanalysis and Feminism; Ecofeminist Writing; History of U.S. Women Photographers; Women and the Law; Feminist Families/Women's Choices; Writer's Workshop: The Gendered Voice; Gender and Culture; Women and Professional Ethics; Women, Affirmative Action and the Law; Women in the Professions; Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice; Ethnic Identity: Women's Voices; British Reform Movements; A Room With a View; Anglophone Women Writers; Women Writes of the British Isles; Women's Autobiographical Writing, Virginia Woolf and Bloomsbury; Women's Autobiographies Through the Arts; Feminist Interpretations of the Gospels.